The Nikon D500 – Reigniting The DX / FX Debate And A Few High ISO Photos

With the introduction of the Nikon D500, I expect the DX/FX debate, which some had considered settled relative to “professional” grade cameras, to reignite. Following are some of my thoughts regarding my photography journey and a perspective on the D500 along with some high ISO photos.

D500_D810_Comparison

“Mirror, mirror on the wall, who has the fairest ISO of them all?”

Like many, I had placed an order for the D500, not knowing if I would keep or cancel it. Given the D500 ship date delays, I didn’t put much stock in the latest rumors indicating the camera would ship on April 22nd. I imagined Nikon was furiously going over every aspect of the D500, to ensure a successful launch, and was willing to push the date again. The lack of comprehensive reviews prior to the ship date caused me to question whether Nikon was making some last minute changes to the D500’s firmware or refining the manufacturing line. I was surprised when I received emails indicating my credit card was charged and the camera would arrive on April 25th.

1) DX Comes Back From The Dead?

When Nikon failed to release the D500 (the DSLR formerly known as the D400)a few years ago, Nasim and others eventually declared DX to be all but officially dead, except for the lower-end of the market. And who could blame them? Rarely a day went by when someone somewhere didn’t lament the delay of the D500. Would anyone venture to guess how many words were written and hours wasted on speculation regarding the D500? Think about that one… Nikon certainly seemed to reinforce the notion of customers moving to FX for pro style bodies and lenses. It rapidly expanded the FX line, rounding it out with the D4, D800/800E/810/810a, D600/610, D750, and the stylish Df, along with a host of FX lenses. I thought Nikon’s urging customers to move to cameras requiring lenses with larger price tags, was a move in the wrong direction – particularly as smartphone cameras began to improve rapidly, the point-and-shoot market began to disappear, the seismic, one-time shift from film to digital was quickly tailing off, and photography technology of all types was coming down in both size and price, while improving in capabilities.

On the DX side? Apart from a few iterations of the D7000, customers received the obligatory 3XXX and 5XXX DSLR iterations, and more 18-to-something lenses. But no pro DX body. No pro DX lenses (with the exception of the Nikon 16-80mm VR). “Nikon” and “professional grade” become synonymous with FX over the last few years. Like many others, I made the leap to FX, despite the increased costs, weight, and loss of the crop factor for wildlife and other high focal length needs. And then Nikon caught us all by surprise with the release of the D500, which had been relegated to the same imaginary status as unicorns, the Loch Ness Monster, Sasquatch, and glass-enclosed aliens stored in the bowels of Area 51, by all but the most ardent Nikon disciples. My immediate thought (after thinking this was another hoax) was to wonder how many hours and words had been wasted over the years in pure speculation and debates over the D500 (“The DSLR formerly known as the D400”). Looking over the D500 specifications, I also wondered if the D500 was going to cause people to rethink the DX vs. FX debate, since it appeared that this DSLR might erase some of the traditional differentiators between the two platforms.

2) Would You Still Choose FX?

While I love the quality of the D800 DSLR series, I was always a bit conflicted with my move from DX to FX. Had Nikon announced the D400 when it was expected, I suspect I would have remained in the DX camp. A number of photographer newbies have come to me over the years, asking my advice regarding FX vs. DX. I have yet to steer anyone toward the FX platform, due to the cost, weight, but also in consideration of the practical benefits of FX over DX for most photographers. Why? I always considered FX overkill for all the but the most demanding professionals, particularly as digital photography technology improvements began to rapidly outpace most people’s ability (or interest) to exploit their full potential. When I asked people why they were considering an FX system, they looked at me incredulously, as if it was so obvious as to be beyond question. But when pressed for an answer, most couldn’t articulate their FX desires very well. Those that could claimed FX provided “better performance at high ISOs”(apart from the other answer – “because all the guys over at http://ift.tt/1rq7nmo said FX is better”). With the introduction of the D500, their answer may technically still be accurate, but to what extent does the difference in high ISO performance matter for practical purposes (taking real pictures under a variety of circumstances – not zooming into photos of brick walls at 400%)?

As I looked at my Nikon D500 and D810, and considered what each had to offer, I wondered what advice I would give myself, if I were to honestly (key word here) assess my needs, interests, photos I have printed, and glance through the 55,000 plus images (after a few purges) stored in my Lightroom catalogue. At 53.1 ounces (1505 grams), the D810/24-105mm feels a good bit heavier than the D500/16-85mm, which weighs 36 ounces (1021 grams) – a 17.1 ounce (484 grams) difference. If weight were the primary factor, the D500/16-85mm would win hands down. Would I tell myself to choose D810/FX route or, in consideration of the above, say “The D500 is more than enough camera for you.” I shared these thoughts with friends via email. One thought I was under the control of a hallucinogen (or just hanging out too much in Colorado). After all, are not more megapixels better? And FX megapixels the best of all? Of course. Well, except if you are also considering a medium format DSLR…)

3) Positioning The D500 – “Just” An Action Camera?

The D500 offers DX users an impressive, balanced feature set that should suffice for any type of photography. I have yet to see a comprehensive review, but if the D500’s feature live up to the hype, the D500 will prove to be a veritable workhorse, just as the D300 was. Many are focusing on the frame rate of the D500, attempting to pigeonhole it as wildlife and sports camera. But at just under 21MP, the D500’s megapixel count is just shy of the legendary Canon 5DM II and III models, higher than the Nikon D700, D3, D4, and Df models, and higher than any variation of the Canon 1D Mark series. With respect to the D5, the D500 equals it with respect to megapixels, and is only a step behind in the FPS rate. The other Nikon cameras, such as the D7100, D7200, D600/610, and D750, with an additional 3 megapixels, cannot claim a meaningful increase in resolution beyond the D500.

As such, I think Nikon’s positioning of the D500 as an action camera (and many simply parroting the marketing message) needs to be questioned. Why is the D500 – with more megapixels than many other flagship DSLRS (and slightly less than others) – being classified solely for wildlife and sports photographers? Because it lacks a pop-up flash and has a high FPS rate? It makes more sense to consider the D500 an all-round pro DX body which should, and probably will, cause some to reconsider the practical benefits of FX. It’s plausible Nikon is purposely stressing the action-oriented aspects of the D500 since it doesn’t want photographers to question its strategy of steering them toward the FX line. But if you a serious amateur like many of us, and use your DSLR for a wide variety of purposes – portraits, family functions, kids sporting events, landscapes, wildlife photos, travel, the occasional macro, etc. – the D500 may represent the best all-round pro body across the Nikon DSLR line. And yes, I recognize one could make a similar case for the D7200, save for the frame rate and buffer.

5) The D500/D810 ISO 6400 Comparison

I was eager to see how well the D500’s high ISO shots compared with those of the D810. ISO 6400 was the key number for me. For that elusive (but always imagined) “photo of a lifetime,” obscene ISO levels will suffice. Better to get “a” picture rather than “no” picture. But for almost everything else – ISO 6400 is probably the practical limit for anything I care to showcase or print. I compared the D500/16-85mm and D810/24-105mm combinations shot offhand from the same position and approximate focal length equivalents. I asked my beautiful, but extremely quiet, assistant, Svetlana, to be my model.

I closely examined the RAW files from both DSLRs. Even when zoomed in at a few hundred percent, I struggled to see any meaningful differences. Downsizing the photos for this article didn’t change my opinion. If you can spot a difference in the noise levels between the D500 and D810, you have much better eyesight than I have. I actually thought the D500 RAW images looked slightly better than those from the D810, but your eyes may lead you to a different conclusion. This was pretty impressive.

5.1) RAW Files

D500 6400 RAW

D500 6400 RAW

D810 6400 RAW

D810 6400 RAW

5.2) Cropped RAW Files

D500 6400 RAW Crop

D500 6400 RAW Crop

D810 6400 RAW Crop

D810 6400 RAW Crop

5.2) Denoised And Sharpened Files

I used Imagenomic’s Noiseware to reduce noise and Nik’s InFocus sharpen the images. As with the RAW files, I was unable to see any difference between the JPEGs, even after employing my usual processing routine.

D500 6400 Denoised Sharpened

D500 6400 Denoised Sharpened

D810 6400 Denoised Sharpened

D810 6400 Denoised Sharpened

5.3) Cropped Denoised And Sharpened Files

D500 6400 Denoised Sharpened Crop

D500 6400 Denoised Sharpened Crop

D810 6400 Denoised Sharpened Crop

D810 6400 Denoised Sharpened Crop

6) The D500/D810 ISO 12800 Comparison

Nasim asked if I would add a similar comparison for ISO 12800. As you can see, both cameras do a pretty solid job. I would avoid shooting this high, but if it were the only option, either camera would produce decent images. Again, pretty remarkable for a DX DSLR.

6.1) RAW Files

D500 12800 RAW

D500 12800 RAW

D810 12800 RAW

D810 12800 RAW

6.2) Cropped RAW Files

D500 12800 RAW Crop

D500 12800 RAW Crop

D810 12800 RAW Crop

D810 12800 RAW Crop

5.2) Denoised And Sharpened Files

D500 12800 Denoised Sharpened

D500 12800 Denoised Sharpened

D810 12800 RAW

D810 12800 RAW

6.3) Cropped Denoised And Sharpened Files

D500 12800 Denoised Sharpened Crop

D500 12800 Denoised Sharpened Crop

D810 12800 Denoised Sharpened Crop

D810 12800 Denoised Sharpened Crop

7) Summary

Given the D500’s ability to effectively match the D810 on the noise front up to ISO 6400, and perhaps beyond, some may wish to reconsider their thoughts regarding the traditional DX and FX platform considerations. The weight/size/cost savings of the DX platform, the benefits of being on the same body style for both visible and infrared photography (one set of lenses vs. two), and the 50% crop factor for wildlife, and how often I take full advantage of the D810’s full 36 megapixels certainly have me questioning whether the D500 and the DX platform are a better fit for my needs. That may seem heretical to my FX pals, one of whom is already sending me highly cropped photos saying, “You will miss this…” No doubt there is a bit of truth in what he is saying. I am on the fence as of now, given my investment in the FX platform. If I were moving to a pro body DSLR today? The decision would be much easier, even with the existing set of DX lenses from Nikon and others. If rumors of Nikon revamping and expanding its DX line of lenses turns out to be true, the decision would be a no-brainer for me. Your needs may be different. Periodically questioning what you believe you think you need, and honestly comparing it what you actually use is always a healthy endeavor. Particularly when it comes to expensive photography gear.

As of this article, we know the D500 is having some SnapBridge connection issues. And some third party batteries are apparently not recognized by the DSLR. With the years of anticipation surrounding the D500 product release, and the sagging photography market, I hope Nikon has learned from its previous product launch mistakes, and will promptly address any/all issues as soon as they are found.

Lately I have been attempting to be more realistic regarding the features and capabilities that really matter, rather than paying attention to those that only dazzle and drive up equipment costs, but are rarely used or fail to make a meaningful difference in my photos. One result of this reflection resulted in my selling two of Nikon’s lens “Trinity” (Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8 and 70-200mm f/2.8), in favor of the Sigma 24-105mm f/4 and Nikon 70-200mm f/4. I have looked over the comments associated with my photos and realized the popular ones cannot be correlated with their megapixel count or the price tag of the lense used to take them. Then again, you might interpret the very notion that I am considering the D500 as further evidence I my Gear Acquisition Syndrome has got the better of me, and I am looking for some excuse to change equipment. Again. 🙂 Something tells me, however, I won’t be the only one reconsidering the DX/FX decision going forward. I am looking forward to Nasim’s detailed review of the D500. Stay tuned…

The post The Nikon D500 – Reigniting The DX / FX Debate And A Few High ISO Photos appeared first on Photography Life.

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5 Tips for More Professional-Looking Food Photography

In an age where iPhones are shooting stellar images and high quality DSLRs are coming down in price, it’s becoming increasingly challenging for food photographers to make a living as professionals. As a food photographer in Seattle, I’ve noticed that many of my clients have become opinionated about what makes a good photo, and in many cases are shooting right next to me with their iPhones. I take it as a positive sign that clients, and most people with smartphones, are becoming more informed and educated about photography, but there is of course the notion that this could very soon make professional photography even more undervalued.

So, what’s a professional food photographer to do? Here are some tips to help make sure you capture quality food photography images that attest to the value of paying you, a professional, to do the job.

Tip #1: Don’t use natural lighting

Food photography tips

Natural lighting is fantastic, and I still try to use it as often as possible. However, many of my clients have realized the value of using natural lighting and tend to shoot their iPhone photos in naturally lit areas. Taking into account the quality of iPhone photos these days, it’s not unusual that their cell phone photos look pretty darn good, even compared to my DSLR shots. To make sure your photos always look unquestionably better than those taken with a cell phone, use natural lighting less and do some experimenting with strobes and off-camera flash.

Tip #2: Shoot in dark spaces

Taking tip #1 into consideration, take full advantage of your professional-grade camera’s low lighting capabilities, and/or your strobe lighting knowledge, by shooting dishes of food in spaces where iPhones have a slim chance of performing well. This is also a good opportunity to incorporate some of the unique features of the restaurant’s interior spaces, into your main shot.

Food photography tips

Photographed in an extremely dark space, this photo wouldn’t have been possible without a DSLR and strobe.

Tip #3: Use a macro lens

While cell phone cameras are becoming equipped with better features with every new release, many still can’t shoot quality macro photos the way that DSLRs can. Use this fact to your advantage and make a macro lens your best friend when shooting food photos. Don’t be afraid to get up close and personal, and capture the details of the dishes you’re shooting. These photos may not be exactly what your clients have in mind, but at the very least it’s always a good thing to show them an alternative perspective that reminds them why they hired you.

Food photography tips

Tip #4: Be a creative director and/or food stylist

Most amateurs approach food photos very statically, opting to shoot dishes from a seated position or overhead. Very few will get creative and incorporate people, props, or activity in their shots. This is your opportunity to shine as a food photographer. Move beyond standalone food photos and use your creativity to make a more dynamic shot. Ways to do this might be capturing action shots, adding a beverage or extra silverware in the shot, or even working with chefs to help them plate dishes in ways that will be photographically appealing. These skills are also part of the reason your client is hiring you, so don’t be afraid to exert your creative authority.

Food photography tips

Tip #5: Shoot tethered

A very simple, yet highly effective, way to come off as a polished, professional photographer is to shoot tethered. If you’re unfamiliar with tethered shooting, it is basically the act of connecting your camera to a computer or tablet, which allows your clients to see your shots on a screen just seconds after you’ve pressed the shutter. This might sound intimidating, but it’s a very simple way to make sure that you and your client are on the same page throughout the photo shoot. It also invites your client to actively participate in the shoot and give you feedback and their own ideas. Tethered shooting is very easy to do using a USB cord or even Wi-Fi technology if your camera has this capability. If you have the means to shoot tethered, definitely consider offering this service to your clients.

Food photography tips

Tip #6: Transmit photos via Wi-Fi

If you have a client who is shooting alongside you with their iPhone, chances are it’s because they want access to photos for immediate posting on social media. Do yourself and your client a favor and offer to send them images on the spot using in-camera Wi-Fi, or do a few quick edits and transmit some shots directly from your computer if you’re shooting tethered. Depending on your agreement with your client, you could even charge a little extra for these services.

Over to you

Do you have other tips for offering more professional-looking food photography that outperforms iPhones and other amateur cameras? Let me know in the comments below!

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How to Make Your Photos Shine Using Clarity, Sharpening, and Dehaze in Lightroom

The goal of any photographer is to make each and every photo stand out from the crowd. Making an image that pops is something that we all strive to achieve, but it’s not always easy to do. Luckily, there are tools at our disposal in Adobe Lightroom that can go a long way to help us achieve an image that we can be proud of, and that catches the attention of the viewer. What are these tools? They are many and varied, but there are three central processing techniques that can make your images transcend the average, and reach the potential you intended. They are Clarity, Sharpness, and Dehaze.

These three tools are deceptively simple and subtle. When used properly, the enhancements they will make to your photos will be nearly imperceivable. They can take your image from good to great, with just a few simple clicks of the mouse. In this tutorial, I will show you how each one of these processing tools affect your photos, and how they can be put to best use, so that your photographs really stand out from the rest. Let’s get started!

After CSD

Clarity

The clarity slider has been around virtually since the inception of Lightroom. You can find it in the Basic panel of the Develop module. It functions to add definition and well, clarity, to your images. It accomplishes this by darkening the lines surrounding the perimeter of objects within your photo. Think of it as contrast on steroids. The clarity slider can really add a lot of punch to your photos, and add drama.

Clarity

Tips for Using the Clarity Slider

  • Don’t add too much. If you push the clarity slider too far to the right, you can begin to see unattractive halos around objects within the frame, resulting in a fake or unnatural looking photograph. If using it globally (applies to the entire image), do so judiciously. Be careful when applying the clarity slider to an entire image, most areas of your photo probably won’t need to be clarified.
  • It’s best to apply clarity after everything else. Since the clarity tool will add a good amount of contrast to your photo, it’s best to apply it towards the end of your workflow. While this is not always true, it is a good guideline to follow in order to avoid the need to backtrack.
  • Use the Adjustment Brush or Graduated Filter tools to apply it to select areas of your image that need clarity. This will enable you to apply clarity only to foregrounds or backgrounds and to specific points you want to emphasize in the image.

Clarity Adjustment

Clarity applied, viewing at 1:1

Clarity applied at +30, viewing at 1:1

Clarity slider taken too far, viewed at 1:1 (100%)

Clarity slider taken too far, viewed at 1:1 (100%)

Sharpness

The art of sharpening an image can often make or break the composition. Sharpening is one of those awesome features of Lightroom which has been around from the beginning, and it only seems to be getting better with time.

Sharpening

The sharpening tool is located under the Details panel in the Develop module. Basically, sharpening is accomplished by adding contrast between pixels so that the area being sharpened appears to have more definition, compared to its surroundings. There are a few key tweaks that you can perform in order to get the most from the sharpening panel.

Make use of the radius slider. The radius controls how many pixels around the perimeter of objects are affected by the sharpening. Think of this as the halo of sharpness. The greater the radius, the more apparent the sharpening will become. Don’t over do the details. You might think the more details you preserve in your sharpening, the better quality your image will be. This is not true. Usually, the farther you move the detail slider to the right, the more grainy and gaudy the image will be. Find a happy medium here and you will be happy in turn.

Global sharpen at +50

Global sharpen at +50

Over sharpened

Over sharpened – this is what too much sharpening looks like at 1:1

Apply sharpening only to the areas you need to sharpen. It’s easy to simply sharpen an entire image instead of taking the time to selectively apply the edit. Rest assured though, if you apply your sharpening using the Adjustment Brush tool you will have a much more aesthetically pleasing result. Much like clarity, you usually do not need to sharpen the whole photograph.

Use the masking slider with the Alt key (Option key on Mac). The masking slider can be considered the most underrated asset in the sharpening panel. It dictates what areas will be sharpened. However, by itself the masking slider is rather lacklustre. This is where the Alt key comes into play. Hold down the Alt key while you adjust the masking slider.

Sharpening Mask

You will see that the image is transformed into a black and white relief image. The areas in white are where the sharpening will be applied; the areas in black will not be sharpened. This is a great way to fine tune your sharpening when adjusting globally. (Note: to keep people’s skin from becoming overly sharp and showing every pore and bump, move the masking slider until the skin areas are black and therefore unaffected by the sharpening adjustment)

Dehaze

This is a feature that was introduced very recently in Lightroom CC. It is a magical little function that people seem to either hate or love.

Dehaze Slider

I for one love this little guy. It’s located under the Effects panel. The explanation of how exactly it works is somewhat cryptic. Here is an answer pulled directly from Adobe Blog:

The Dehaze technology is based on a physical model of how light is transmitted, and it tries to estimate light that is lost due to absorption and scattering through the atmosphere.

Simply put, the dehaze slider can reduce haze within your images. It can also add a mystical fogginess as well if you choose (just slide it the other way).

Dehaze

Basically, it will make an otherwise hazy photo more clear. This comes in handy for photographs of the night sky when your want to make the stars more pronounced, or when you have to deal with physically dense atmospheric conditions.

Tips for Using the Dehaze Slider

  • Keep an eye on your black points within the image. The dehaze slider can cause loss of shadow detail if you push it too far. Use the J key to show highlight and shadow clipping in order to preserve details.
  • Perform your white balance adjustments BEFORE you apply dehaze. The dehaze tool can do some incredible things for your photo, but it can also cause some funky color distortions if you adjust white balance after the fact. As always, strive to obtain optimal white balance before you ever begin to post-process an image.
  • Sometimes an image will benefit from added haze instead of dehazing. Experiment with adding a small amount of haze by moving the dehaze slider to the left. This can add an ethereal glow to some landscapes and even portraits.
Dehaze +20 at 1:10 view

Dehaze +20 at 1:10 view

Dehaze pulled too far

Dehaze pulled too far

As with all post-processing, the less you have to adjust after the image has been made, the better off you will be. The tools in Lightroom are a fantastic way to bring out the true power of your photographs, if you use them deliberately, and with good judgment.

Before clarity, sharpening and dehaze

Before clarity, sharpening and dehaze

After

After

After clarity, sharpening and dehaze were applied

After clarity, sharpening and dehaze were applied

Any adjustments you make to the clarity and sharpness of your photo should never make them appear unrealistic (with exceptions) or detract from your original vision. Even the dehaze tool should be used sparingly and only when required. Just as the saying goes that one brush stroke can ruin a painting, so too can one more click of the slider. The goal of post-processing is to enhance a photograph to the point of meeting your pre-visualzation. No more and no less. Experiment with the tips you’ve learned here and witness the hidden potential within your own photographs!

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The post How to Make Your Photos Shine Using Clarity, Sharpening, and Dehaze in Lightroom by Adam Welch appeared first on Digital Photography School.

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Ronda Countryside, Ronda, 2015 – 28 Apr 2016 – Flickr


Ronda is the most spectacular and popular example of hilltowns in this area. It is easy to underestimate Ronda and not give it the attention it deserves. It is also where bullfighting started and the newer (but still old) town that you can see to the right is quite extensive with some of the best tapas restaurants in Spain. Often a tapas crawl in places like Seville caters to tourists and does not offer a truly authentic experience. Spending less than a full day in Ronda is a crime and several days if you want to take in the local environs is worth serious consideration. More can be learned here: http://ift.tt/1QGamLS

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Weekly Photography Challenge – Urban Decay

If you live in a city now is your chance to get out and hunt for some run down, dilapidated, crumbling buildings that say urban decay to you.

Thomas Hawk

By Thomas Hawk

Weekly Photography Challenge – Urban Decay

You can handle this challenge and subject however you wish to approach it. Shoot or convert to black and white, try some HDR, how about doing some light painting at night? The choice is yours. Go find a good subject, take a friend along too, and shoot away!

NOTE: As always though – please put your safety and taking the proper precautions to ensure you aren’t trespassing on private property or endangering yourself or anyone else in the process of getting your photos. Safety and getting proper permissions come first!

Pelle Sten

By Pelle Sten

Louis Du Mont

By Louis du Mont

Babak Fakhamzadeh

By Babak Fakhamzadeh

Toby Bradbury

By Toby Bradbury

Neal Wellons

By Neal Wellons

David Barnas

By David Barnas

Share your images below:

Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer upload them to your favourite photo sharing site and leave the link to them. Show me your best images in this week’s challenge. Sometimes it takes a while for an image to appear so be patient and try not to post the same image twice.

Julian Lennon

By Julian Lennon

Freaktography

By Freaktography

David Barnas

By David Barnas

Darkday

By darkday

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The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Urban Decay by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.

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The Best Spring Photos on Instagram

Now that the snow has melted, spring has re-emerged in all its glory and has brought the sun with it. It’s finally acceptable to go outside in shorts and enjoy the warm spring days, while capturing some of the best parts of springtime on Instagram. Photographers are now out in full force capturing blooming flowers, lazy days at the park, and trips to the farmers markets. It’s time to enjoy the season with the best moments captured from the emergence of spring.

Let’s take the time to stop and smell the roses with the best spring-inspired photos on Instagram:

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25 Dilapidated Images of Urban Decay and Grunge

Many photographers are fascinated with old things, the more decayed and falling apart the better. Urban decay and grunge is a popular subject for photographers in cities. Some go out of their way to find abandoned buildings and little known spots.

Perhaps like these images:

Wayne Stadler

By Wayne Stadler

Vincent Ferron

By Vincent Ferron

RAFFI YOUREDJIAN

By RAFFI YOUREDJIAN

Ghalam_DAR

By ghalam_DAR

Anna S.

By Anna S.

Claudia M Eastman

By Claudia M Eastman

Nano Anderson

By Nano Anderson

Simon Samuelsson

By Simon Samuelsson

OlavXO

By olavXO

Howard Ignatius

By Howard Ignatius

Freaktography

By Freaktography

Freaktography

By Freaktography

Andre Valente

By Andre Valente

Freaktography

By Freaktography

Pietromassimo Pasqui

By Pietromassimo Pasqui

Maurizio

By Maurizio

Oreste Messina

By Oreste Messina

Maurizio

By Maurizio

Mariyan Dimitrov

By Mariyan Dimitrov

Daniel Go

By Daniel Go

Kamil Dziedzina

By Kamil Dziedzina

Darkday

By darkday

Darkday

By darkday

Guillaume DELEBARRE (Guigui-Lille)

By Guillaume DELEBARRE (Guigui-Lille)

Thomas Hawk

By Thomas Hawk

 

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